Plausible Deniability

Reporters won’t talk about murder for hire. They’ll show someone who has been busted trying to hire an undercover cop to kill someone, or they’ll report that someone has been put in jail for it. But nothing that might worry people makes the news. There are no reports of someone who is arrested for murder for hire, because they might get off, or get off lightly, and this is not the kind of news that would benefit rich people who want to be able to kill lilttle people. Reassuring news is played.

Have you *ever* heard a news story reporting that a murder was committed that was probably murder for hire? Does this mean that murder for hire doesn’t happen, or that it just isn’t reported on?

I’ve had people talk about killing me in front of me. More than once I’ve identified a trigger man to the police while he had a gun on him. Police take him off to the side, search him, carefully fail to find the gun, and let him go. In one case they refused to understand who I was pointing out, until a girl they had been talking to said, “Nah, he means that guy over there. And he has something going on because he is shaking like a leaf!” — It was only then that the police gave the man a faux-search.

That’s plausible deniability. That’s how plausible deniability works. Everyone knows and everyone understands and everyone simply must pretend that they don’t know and don’t understand, no matter how thin the sham becomes. And everything about our system is organized to maintain plausible deniability.

When you call the FBI to tell them someone intends to kill you, what they’ll do is refer you to the state or town police. As far as I know, they won’t even record your name normally. What that means is that when you get killed there are no statistics that indicate that you’ve placed repeated calls to the FBI and they’ve done nothing. The state police will refer you down to the town police, because the town police are the ones who are responsible for ensuring your safety. The town police will refer you down to the cop on the beat.

The cop on the beat is not interested in hearing about anything that happened outside of the town he works for. He is only interested in crimes that have happened or will happen in his jurisdiction. Not interested in what happened one town over. That is universally true, by virtue of his position as a town cop. Therefore he is the one person in law enforcement perfectly unsuited to dealing with a hit. Therefore he is the one person you will always be refered to.

Other than that, reactions vary. Sometimes he’ll scratch his head and say, “Gee I don’t have anything for that. Really you need to call the FBI.” Other times he’ll yell at you, as if he has caught you speeding, to try to talk some sense into you. It depends on whether he feels threatened. The less he feels threatened, the more he doesn’t understand what’s going on. So he’s either useless by way of incompetence or complicity.

Usually people don’t want, in talking to police, to name names. That’s because they want to be safe. They’re hoping the customer will forgive them. In my case, I hoped for a year the Cambodians would forgive me. After a year I was told I was forgiven. But it turned out that was just the family of the young man I insulted. He himself still resented me.

Then I hoped he’d forgive me for another year. I made it through that year too. Then the hit was off awhile, and now it’s back on.

I do not know if now if it’s the young man again, or the businessmen have decided I know too much about their operations and I am a threat. Keep in mind that the businessmen, by the end of a standard six-month contract, have invested a great deal of money in bribes and maintaining surveillance, in flagging your ID and perhaps even tampering with your passport record. So they are hostile to any attempt you may make to make peace with the customer, and are likely to address themselves to any middlemen you may try to recruit.

This is another reason law enforcement never gets off its ass when it comes to murder for hire. If they were to, it would be a pretty sweet deal: they give you a new social security number and two whole years of government security — *if* you’re able to turn state’s witness, which means that you can give testimony to a crime. But if you’re just little people who the great people of society have decided to kill, and if you don’t want to make trouble by naming names, there’s nothing the FBI can do. As one FBI agent told me, “Sir, we’re the FBI. We investigate crimes. If we *protected people* we’d be at it all day.”

Now it is wrong to think that this is dysfunctional. It is not dysfunctional It is designed to allow rich people to kill little people.

One time I heard a woman on her cell on a greyhound bus, a couple seats behind me, say, “So now we’re going to kill this tall redheaded guy…” And everyone kind of froze to see what I’d do. That’s what you have to understand. It’s a team effort. And it works because all anyone needs is plausible deniability, and the press cooperates, because the press has a soft policy of only reporting what police say about unsolved violent crimes.

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Published in: on March 31, 2011 at 12:02 pm  Leave a Comment  
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